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Lori MacVittie

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Top Stories by Lori MacVittie

Security as Code One of the most difficult things to do today, given the automated environments in which we operate, is to identify a legitimate user. Part of the problem is that the definition of a legitimate users depends greatly on the application. Your public facing website, for example, may loosely define legitimate as "can open a TCP connection and send HTTP request" while a business facing ERP or CRM system requires valid credentials and group membership as well as device or even network restrictions. This task is made more difficult by the growing intelligence of bots. It's not just that they're masquerading as users of IE or Mozilla or Chrome, they're beginning to act like they're users of IE and Mozilla and Chrome. Impersonators are able to fool systems into believing they are "real" users; human beings, if you will, and not merely computerized artifacts. ... (more)

Microservices: Operationalization of the Network | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Why Microservices Are Driving Operationalization of the Network Microservices. Service-oriented, but not SOA, this architecture is becoming more common as mobility and time to market drives up the ante in this high stakes game of applications. But just what are microservices? If you want a more complete and lengthy view I highly recommend reading Martin Fowler's series on the topic. If you're looking for a summary, then read on. Microservices are the result of decomposing applications. That may sound a lot like SOA, but SOA was based on an object-oriented (noun) premise; that is... (more)

What Ops Needs to Know about HTTP/2 | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

What Ops Needs to Know about HTTP/2 So HTTP/2 is official. That means all the talking is (finally) done and after 16 years of waiting, we've got ourselves a new lingua franca of the web. Okay, maybe that's pushing it, but we do have a new standard to move to that offers some improvements in the areas of resource management and performance that make it definitely worth taking a look at. For example, HTTP/2 is largely based on SPDY (that's Google's SPDY, for those who might have been heads down in the data center since 2009 and missed its introduction) which has proven, in the field... (more)

The Art of Scale with Microservices | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

The Art of Scale: Microservices, The Scale Cube and Load Balancing Microservice architectures are the new hotness, even though they aren't really all that different (in principle) from the paradigm described by SOA (which is dead, or not dead, depending on whom you ask). One of the things this decompositional approach to application architecture does is encourage developers and operations (some might even say DevOps) to re-evaluate scaling strategies. In particular, the notion is forwarded that an application should be built to scale and then infrastructure should assist where ne... (more)

Microservices: The Proxy is the App By @LMacVittie | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

The Proxy is the App How microservices change the role of the network in next-generation application architectures. Microservices, for the uninitiated, are essentially the decomposition of applications into multiple services. This decomposition is often based on functional lines, with related functions being grouped together into a service. While this may sound a like SOA, it really isn't, especially given that SOA was an object-centered methodology that focused on creating services around "nouns" like customer and product. Microservices, while certainly capable of being noun-b... (more)